Rakkautta & Anarkiaa 2016 – part III

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The second Friday of the festival and my second to last day in it. Had a four day break before this day, which refreshed me nicely for the final two days.

Mr. Gaga [2015]

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Again we circle back to the importance of art and how I can appreciate art more, when I know enough context for it. This is a documentary about Ohad Naharin, a choreographer and dancer, who changed the language of modern dance for ever with his Gaga style. I haven’t seen any dance pieces by Naharin live, but I think I’ve seen something in the TV without realizing it, since his language of dance is quite distinctive.

This is a pretty straight forward documentary, so nothing revolutionary there. I guess this is the first one that was produced with extensive access to the Batsheva Dance Company’s film archives, which allows the film to show things from beyond the 8-year filming period of this film.

The director Tomer Heymann, was with us watching the film and answering questions afterwards, and what I gathered from him was, that he was pretty much like me – an uncultured person taking steps into his life as an independent adult and encountering art forcibly for the first time… and realizing that life without art is pretty much meaningless.

This shows from the documentary – Naharin is placed on a pedestal and kept there. There’s a few moments, where some cracks are shown. Then again, it doesn’t really matter. This is not an opinion piece on an important political topic or the like. This is about dance, and about how that dance was born. We see enough dancing and enough context to learn to appreciate Naharin’s flavor of dance and that’s enough for me.

Seems like I’ve was at quite a tender state during the festival, but this was yet another film that made me cry – for the beauty of dance this time.

  • Director: Tomer Heymann
  • Watched on: 23rd Sep 2016
  • Watched at: Orion
  • 4/5

Swiss Army Man [2016]

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For all the elating films I saw during the festival, this was a nice balancing act. Some people have called this Harry Potter 8, since it has Daniel Radcliffe playing Manny, a dead and decaying body. My inner Harry Potter died a little during the film…

Hank (played by Paul Dano) is a depressed man stranded on a desert island. One morning a body drifts ashore and Hank loots the belt from its pants to hang himself with… But then the corpse starts to fart and it seems like it is trying to tell Hank something. They end up taking a jet ski ride out from the island with the body acting as the jet ski powered by the farts… From there it doesn’t get much better.

In my books, this is usually recipe for disaster. I don’t like the comedies, where the joke is the first one that comes to mind. Some real thought has been put into this one. The jokes are stupid but surprising. The plot is non-existent, but you find yourself rooting for Hank and Manny to kiss… and only when they do, realize what you were rooting for.

Really a magnificent effort considering that the premise is a dead body that farts and talks a lot for being dead…

  • Director: Dan Kwan, Daniel Scheinert
  • Watched on: 23rd Sep 2016
  • Watched at: Savoy
  • 3.5/5

This was again a good day. An elating documentary on dance and a less elating film on farts. Not your everyday combination.

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